04-13-11-hong-kong-park

There is a tower in the middle of Hong Kong Park. It is in the shape of a double helix and 108 steps to the top. Once there you can see a fair amount of Mid-Levels and Admiralty. And because there is no elevator, very few people care to climb all the way to the top leaving me alone overlooking the old churches in Old Central District. The view looking west was of St. Joseph’s College (blue roof to the left) and Church (blue roof at center). The college is the oldest Catholic school in Hong Kong and was founded in 1875. I’m not sure when the church itself was built and can’t find any info online. But, this church is painted a beautiful sky blue with large arching windows. From the looks of it I would place it around WWII for the “modern” look and feel as well as the cast cantilevered cement construction. This method of construction was first used by Frank Lloyd Wright in the Falling Water House. Below is a quick sketch of the facade. You can see that the windows are inset in the concrete similar in style to the way Le Corbusier designed the Notre Dame de Haute.

04-13-11-st-josephs

Below St. Joseph’s is the Helena May Institute (top painting,white building in the lower right) was built in 1916 and was temp housing for unaccompanied British women. During WWII it was taken over by the Japanese for troop housing. Afterwards it reverted back to housing British expat women until 1985, when it was open to women of all nationalities.

St. Joseph’s & the Helena May Institute – painting
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7 thoughts on “St. Joseph’s & the Helena May Institute – painting

  • April 13, 2011 at 8:44 pm
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    John, I love the top painting. It reminds me of the first time I visited Salzburg. Many of the roofs in the old city are a turquoise blue and I felt like the city was graced with a beautiful turquoise necklace that ran through it. Thank you for the information.

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  • May 9, 2011 at 4:58 am
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    Lovely painting John. We were the English couple who took a card and said hi at the top of the Tower just as you started it. We were on our honeymoon and had a fantastic time in Hong Kong.

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    • May 9, 2011 at 7:10 am
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      Thank you Stuart. And you visited just in time. The weather has gotten much warmer and very humid. Congratulations on your marriage and wish you have many happy years together.

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  • April 16, 2014 at 3:25 pm
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    I went to that school when I was young. I really like the painting. Is it for sale? -Edmond

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    • April 16, 2014 at 4:03 pm
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      Hi Edmond,
      it is for sale. I just recently moved. so give me time to locate it. I can send you the actual size and a better picture. Thanks for the interest. -john

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  • April 16, 2014 at 5:08 pm
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    From the webpage of Catholic Doicese of Hong Kong …. it looks like it was first built in 1872, rebuilt in 1876 after a typhoon destruction in 1874. it became a Parish in 1949. The ship-like structure and the rests were “reconstructed” in 1968.

    Yes, late 60’s in style.

    http://www.catholicheritage.org.hk/en/catholic_building/st_joseph_s_church_garden_road/index.html

    one interesting thing to note: “… it represented one of the only three remaining Catholic churches at that time, the other two being the Immaculate Conception Church at Wellington Street and the St. Francis Church in Wanchai.” You could find them on Caine Road and Kennedy Road respectively.

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